Comparing average salary and life expenses between Lithuania and Denmark

Based on our database records and publicly available data the comparison between the two countries is the following
Average yearly salary in Lithuania isdown arrow 23,690 USD (data retrieved September 2023)
Average yearly salary in Denmark isup arrow 73,200 USD (data retrieved September 2023)

Lithuania

On Average a person working in Lithuania would earn about 32% of what a person working in Denmark would.
This makes Lithuania a lower income country comparing to Denmark.

Highest paying jobs in Lithuania
1. Orthopaedic surgeon (238,854 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
2. Cardiologist (198,830 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
3. Medical director neurosurgery (192,116 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
4. Neurosurgeon (186,177 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
5. Colorectal surgeon (185,919 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
6. Urologist (181,529 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
7. Oncologist (181,529 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
8. Chiropractic radiologist (181,529 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
9. Oral and maxillofacial surgeon (181,529 EUR per year, pre-tax.)
10. Plastic surgeon (181,529 EUR per year, pre-tax.)

Average costs of living in Lithuania

The Cost of Living in Lithuania: A Comprehensive Overview

Introduction Lithuania, a vibrant Baltic nation known for its rich history and stunning landscapes, offers a relatively affordable cost of living compared to many Western European countries. This article aims to provide a comprehensive overview of the costs associated with living in Lithuania, with approximate expenses listed in USD. Please note that these figures are approximate and may vary depending on personal preferences and location within the country.

Accommodation Renting a one-bedroom apartment in the city center can range from $400 to $700 per month, while outside the city center, prices may drop to around $300 to $500. Alternatively, purchasing an apartment in the city center can cost between $1,200 and $2,000 per square meter.

Utilities Basic utilities including electricity, heating, cooling, water, and garbage services for a small apartment typically amount to approximately $100 to $150 per month.

Transportation Public transportation in Lithuania is efficient and affordable. Monthly passes for buses, trams, and trolleybuses can be obtained for around $25 to $40. Taxis are also reasonably priced, with a 5-mile journey costing roughly $10.

Groceries The cost of groceries in Lithuania is generally lower compared to other European countries. On average, a single person can expect to spend around $150 to $200 per month on basic food items, including fresh produce, dairy products, and meat.

Dining Out Eating out at a mid-range restaurant in Lithuania can cost between $10 and $20 per person, excluding drinks. Fast-food meals typically range from $3 to $7.

Healthcare Lithuania has a well-developed healthcare system, with both public and private options available. Public healthcare is accessible to residents and is partially funded by taxes. The cost of private health insurance can vary but generally falls between $40 and $100 per month.

Education Lithuania offers free education in public schools, including universities, for its residents. However, international students may need to pay tuition fees, which can range from $2,000 to $8,000 per year, depending on the program and institution.

Entertainment Cultural events, museums, and cinemas in Lithuania are reasonably priced. Movie tickets cost around $5 to $7, while concert tickets can range from $10 to $30, depending on the performer.

Clothing The cost of clothing in Lithuania is comparable to other European countries. Basic items such as jeans, t-shirts, and shoes can be purchased at affordable prices, with a monthly average expenditure of approximately $50 to $100.

Miscellaneous Expenses Additional expenses such as internet services ($15 to $30 per month), gym memberships ($20 to $40 per month), and personal care products ($20 to $40 per month) should also be considered when calculating monthly expenses.

Summary In summary, the cost of living in Lithuania is relatively affordable compared to many Western European countries. A single person can expect to spend approximately $800 to $1,200 per month, including accommodation, utilities, transportation, groceries, dining out, healthcare, and entertainment. These figures provide a general overview and may vary based on individual preferences and location within Lithuania.

Denmark

On Average a person working in Denmark would earn about 309% of what a person working in Lithuania would.
This makes Denmark a higher income country comparing to Lithuania.

Highest paying jobs in Denmark
1. Orthopaedic surgeon (5,166,273 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
2. Cardiologist (4,300,576 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
3. Medical director neurosurgery (4,155,361 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
4. Neurosurgeon (4,026,897 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
5. Colorectal surgeon (4,021,318 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
6. Urologist (3,926,370 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
7. Oncologist (3,926,370 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
8. Chiropractic radiologist (3,926,370 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
9. Oral and maxillofacial surgeon (3,926,370 DKK per year, pre-tax.)
10. Plastic surgeon (3,926,370 DKK per year, pre-tax.)

Average costs of living in Denmark

The Cost of Living in Denmark: A Comprehensive Overview

Introduction Denmark, known for its high quality of life and strong social welfare system, is also renowned for being one of the most expensive countries to live in. In this article, we will delve into the various costs associated with living in Denmark, providing approximate expenses in USD and summarizing monthly expenses.

Accommodation Renting an apartment in Denmark can be quite expensive, especially in major cities like Copenhagen. On average, a one-bedroom apartment in the city center can cost around $1,500 to $2,000 per month, while outside the city center, prices may range from $1,200 to $1,600.

Utilities Utilities, including electricity, heating, water, and garbage, can amount to approximately $150 to $200 per month, depending on the size of the apartment and consumption habits.

Transportation Public transportation in Denmark is reliable and efficient, but it can be costly. Monthly passes for buses, trains, and metros can range between $70 and $100, depending on the region.

Food and Groceries Denmark has a reputation for its high-quality, yet expensive, food products. A monthly grocery bill for a single person can range from $300 to $400, depending on personal preferences and eating habits.

Dining Out Eating out at restaurants or cafes can be a treat but comes at a higher price. A mid-range three-course meal for two people can cost around $80 to $120, excluding drinks.

Health Insurance Denmark has a comprehensive healthcare system, and all residents are required to have health insurance. The monthly premium for health insurance can vary but is typically around $150 to $250, depending on age and income.

Education While primary and secondary education is free in Denmark, higher education can be quite expensive for international students. Tuition fees for universities can range from $8,000 to $20,000 per year, depending on the institution and program.

Leisure and Entertainment Engaging in leisure activities such as going to the cinema, visiting museums, or attending concerts can be costly. On average, a ticket to a movie theater can cost around $15, while museum entry fees range from $10 to $20.

Clothing Clothing prices in Denmark are relatively high compared to other countries. Budgeting around $100 to $150 per month for clothing expenses should be sufficient for most individuals.

Miscellaneous Expenses Miscellaneous expenses, such as personal care products, mobile phone bills, internet services, and gym memberships, can amount to approximately $100 to $150 per month.

Summary Considering all the aforementioned expenses, a rough estimate of the monthly cost of living in Denmark for a single person would be around $2,500 to $3,500. However, it is important to note that these figures can vary significantly depending on personal lifestyle choices, location, and individual circumstances.


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